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Holocranial

Chronic tension-type headache: Advice for the viselike-headache ...

Location Bifrontal,holocranial Unilateral Unilateral,orbital Associated None Nausea and vomiting Partial Horner syndrome symptoms Photophobia,phonophobia Lacrimation

How do I diagnose headache?

headache can be bifrontal or holocranial, rather than unilateral, in up to 40% of sufferers. Equally, individuals often have difficulty describing pain, and non-pulsatile

HEADACHES: PRACTICAL MANAGEMENT

It may be followed by a longer duration posterior or holocranial dull ache. Perhaps 10-20% are due to a posterior fossa lesion such as a Chiari malformation.

Migraine and epistaxis: An interesting combination

This is the report of a 28 year old woman who had a holocranial pulsating headache once a month with nausea, photophobia and phonophobia lasting about 48 hours.

Surgical treatment of isolated and syndromic craniosynostosis ...

delling (holocranial dismantling) in scaphocephaly (13 cases). Type V belonged to fronto-orbital remodelling without fronto-orbital bandeau in trigonocephaly (50

Primary Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome Presenting as Venous ...

she developed severe holocranial continuous headache and vomiting. Seven days later she developed sudden onset of weakness of right side of the body with facial deviation to

Spontaneous intracranial hypotension associated with transdural ...

presented with a 6-week history of severe holocranial headache, which worsened when she was upright and im-proved when she was recumbent. She also experienced

JEFFERSON HEADACHE CENTER

Around head (holocranial) Eye Ear Neck Jaw Other: _____ Sidedness: Change sides Right-sided Between attacks Left-sided During attacks

© JAPI • VOL. 55 • OCTOBER 2007 www.japi.org 717

... arrow) Fig. 4 : MRI showing parotid cyst (arrow), hyperintense in T2 Fig. 5 : USG (a) and MRI showing cyst inside rectus muscle A 32 years male presented with holocranial ...

Diagnosis and Treatment of Pediatric Migraine

be bilateral, temporal, occipital, or holocranial. Childhood migraine differs from adult migraine in that headache is shorter (1–72 hours) and more often